Ulrike Johannsen

Ulrike Johannsen

Ulrike Johannsen is from Vienna and our resident artist under the Open Residency Program for August 2018. She graduated from the Academy of Fine Arts, Vienna and have been actively creating and exhibiting works as well as receiving awards, grants and residencies all over the world. Ulrike is currently teaching in KunstModeDesign Herbststrasse and was a guest teacher and artist in several schools around the world.

In my installations, objects and paper works I question the promises of happiness and tempting offerings of our consumer oriented lifestyle. Quoting, processing and manipulating the language of our popular media and culture industry, I try to make the gap visible between our needs and desires and the seduction of consumer-capitalist promises. I am interested in how the collective construction of society and culture functions and how we negotiate and communicate these different perceptions.

Ulrike’s current work is a series of sculptures and small installations which are dealing with Love and Erotics in times of capitalism. Eva Illouz’s notion of sexual capital understandable as part of the economical capital as well as Pierre Bourdieu’s notion of Habitus and Byung Chul Han’s considerations about the idea of beauty do inform her work.

Ulrike runs her own art space called Clubclub and you can check out her website and instagram to learn more about her and her work.

Nadhir Nor

Nadhir Nor

Nadhir Nor (b. 1994) is an illustrator based in Sungai Buloh, Selangor. Graduated from The One Academy, Sunway he aspires to dabble in as many media he can try on from a mural commission for Urbanscapes (2016), to designing journals and sketchbooks for Journalife (2017). He is also interested in all things otherworldly. Mythology, ancient cultures and its relationship with modern society are some of the major subjects explored in his works. He believes that there’s something about finding the otherworldly in the mundane and vice versa, and this makes a story worth told. He strives to share as much magical body of work as he can with the world.

Nadhir is our resident artist for August – September 2018. For his stay at Rimbun Dahan, he will be exploring ways to bridge his works back to traditional media. He wants to try to reconnect with the physicality and textures that traditional work has to offer while also exploring world-building fictional folklores in local cultures.

You can follow more of his work at his tumblr and facebook page.

 

Barred Eagle Owl

Barred Eagle Owl

Yesterday, our staff found this dying Barred Eagle Owl on the ground near the front compound.

“The barred eagle-owl (Bubo sumatranus), also called the Malay eagle-owl, is a species of owl in the family Strigidae. It is a member of the large genus Bubo which is distributed on most of the world’s continents. This relatively little-known species is found from the southern Malay Peninsula down a string of several of the larger southeast Asian islands to as far as Borneo.” – wikipedia

It looked like it ate a poisonous or poisoned animal and subsequently poisoned itself. We at Rimbun Dahan are against poisoning rodents (we choose to catch and humanely kill them) to avoid affecting their natural predators like the owl or other animals in the vicinity. It is also possible that this one accidentally ate a poisonous animal or snake.

We do have several Barred Eagle Owl nests in Rimbun Dahan but they seldom hatch more than a couple of chicks at one time and they can be quite frail and vulnerable creatures growing up.

“This species probably pairs for life. Barred eagle-owls seems to be very attached to a particular nesting site. If not disturbed, they will occupy the same territory for several years and, if one partner dies, the surviving mate will maintain the same territory with another owl parent. This species nests either in large tree cavities or, in Java and Sumatra, on top of the large fern Asplenium nidus.” – wikipedia

This beautiful female was buried yesterday after it died but we hope nothing tragic happens to its family.

Chuah Shu Ruei

Chuah Shu Ruei

Chuah Shu Ruei is an emerging contemporary artist based in Kuala Lumpur, Malaysia. Having graduated from ASWARA (National Academy of Arts, Heritage and Culture) in 2013, and also having done apprenticeships with Long Thien Shih and Studio TERUSI (a Malaysian artist collective), her educational exposure to traditional Malaysian heritage strongly informs her practice, which is primarily ephemeral community art installation projects. Her practice also includes mixed media collages that play with perceptual change and interaction with time, space, light and shadow, and an actively engaged/included viewer. The categories of installation and collage work often combine into/overlap each other in her practice, as her overall body of work branches into themes of multi-culturalism, inclusivity, assimilation and validation of the collective mindset, to be further explored  during her Rimbun Dahan residency.

Since 2011, her installation works have been exhibited in Kuala Lumpur, Langkawi and Penang, and most recently in 2017 as part of her solo residencies in Reunion Island (France) and Cebu (Philippines). In Malaysia, her object based artworks have been exhibited in group shows at Core Design Gallery, Hin Bus Art Depot, the 8thInternational Art Expo Malaysia, Pelitahati Gallery, the National Visual Art Gallery, Richard Koh Fine Art,  as well as in group exhibitions in Thailand, Singapore, and most recently Turkey. Her artwork is also part of the art collection featured in ‘Rumah Malaysia’(the Malaysian Embassy) in Beijing.

Shu Ruei is our resident artist for six months and will be exhibiting her work at our gallery in January 2019 along with Wong Xiang Yi. You can find out more about her at her facebook page and her website.

Hings Lim

Hings Lim

Hings Lim (b. 1989, Malaysia) studied Fine Art at the Universiti Malaysia Sarawak, Malaysia. He was awarded the Chair of P. Ramlee from Petronas Award in 2012. He is a multidisciplinary artist based in Kuala Lumpur. Working with a wide range of materials including situations, videos, objects and paintings, Hings is interested in intricating art and life by exploring experiences and relations of reality.

Hings will be at Rimbun Dahan as a resident artist from mid July to end of August 2018, via a collaboration with Richard Koh Fine Art. Through this residency program, Hings wishes to integrate the encounters of things and beings in the surrounding of nature and the everyday life around Rimbun Dahan, while exploring their relations.

 

 

Lauren Lee

Lauren Lee

Lauren Jeyoon Lee was born in Maryland, USA and moved to South Korea when she as four. She spent most of her teenage years in Singapore and returned to USA to receive her education in Fine Arts. Lauren is currently a grad student from Yale University and is spending three weeks in Rimbun Dahan as an Open Residency artist. Lauren’s a sculptor who works with found objects and clay. Her working process heavily involves writing that are often reduced as titles to inform and create narratives for visual elements.

A pair of large plastic breasts labeled “Super Droopers.”
A two feet long rubber chew toy with orange bulbs on both ends.
A red SOLO cup full of half-thawed chicken feet.
A bag full of Joshua Nelson’s beard.
A petri dish with mice fetuses.
A burnt-out glue gun with strands of blonde hair around it.
Aqua beads soaked in black vinegar.
A picture of my five-year-old-self crying with chewing gum glued over my boobs. A plastic bag of flesh toned cosmetic sponges.

A bag of make-up sponges sold for $1.29. I opened it and took a sniff. It smelled like my mother’s pillow. My mother spent every Sunday night with me. She would leave my grandparents’ house the next morning for work. I always believed I could cling on to her. It never worked. My grandfather would wake me up instead in his bright blue sweatpants that smelled like his medicine cabinet. So I would bury my face in my mother’s pillowcase to smell her instead. My grandfather would then carry me to the living room and lay me down on a leather sofa. It felt cold even on summer days. That was my Monday morning until I grew tall enough to realize how childish it is to feel that empty.

I have been reliving my childhood since then. Hiding behind the weight of cultural and religious issues, I laughed at traditional values imposed on me and unresolved resentment the Korean War had left on my grandparents. When I moved to Singapore in sixth grade, I witnessed my mother’s loneliness as a woman away from her lover. When I came to America, I witnessed middle-aged adults, self-proclaimed children of God, be possessed with petty jealousy over the death of a family member. I now maliciously poke fun at the emotional conflicts and complex feelings adults engaged in, with different materials, from a glamorous piece of bronze to a cheap clump of fake hair.

So I started collecting. I collect cheap things that trigger feelings of shame; humiliation; regret; disgust; and sometimes humor. I frequent local dollar stores, beauty supplies, pet shops and sex shops to rummage through things. Some give me immediate answers and others have eldritch noise. I spend time with them. I wrestle with them. Most of them are willing to work with me at first. They would bend, squish, tear and bond themselves, as I demand. Soon they start to rebel. They straighten themselves up, separate from the others and refuse to be put back together. Like a frustrated, demented child, I angrily pierce, nail, shove and tighten them. Some give in, others refuse. They are awkwardly and precariously put together. I see myself in them, insignificant and small, yet screaming to validate my existence to someone.

During her stay in Rimbun Dahan, Lauren plans to create assemblages and drawings specific to this place, informed by the interactions with people, locals and expats that she’ll meet. Lauren will be with us throughout July 2018.

Kemian Hitam

Kemian Hitam

Our staff found some lumps of kemian hitam, a type of aromatic resin that came from the rotting wood of Canarium littorale or kedondong bulan which had been struck by lightning a while ago. Half of the tree was killed and rotting on the ground.

 

Kemian Hitam from the rotting wood of a C. littorale

 

The resin has a very nice fragrance when burned. According to the Internet it is also associated with occult practices: it may be used to summon “makhluk halus alam bawahan, Jin Tanah, Jin Pokok, Jin Batu dan yang sebangsa dengannya.” A comment on our facebook post claims that kemian hitam is used in smoking and cleaning woven textile such as songket, limar and kelingkam by suspending the cloth on a rack of netting and smoking kemian beneath it. This method is thought to kill bugs that may feed on the textile as well as get rid of mold.

Shorea materialis

Shorea materialis

In April, we had a massive flowering of Shorea materialis, commonly called “balau pasir“, on one of several huge trees planted in the early 90s. Now we have a crop of tens of thousands of seedlings carpeting the ground.

Norsham Yaakob has already taken over a thousand to grow on at FRIM.

Manuela Hincapie Vidal

Manuela Hincapie Vidal

 

Manuela Hincapie Vidal is our Open Residency artist from Kentucky, USA. She is with us from 12 June until 30 August 2018. Below is her artist statement about her residency with us:

As an artist, immigrant, and peace and social justice scholar, I process both my reality and that of others through an array of lenses that continuously inform my artwork.

In the past three years, these gender, race, spiritual, environmental, and feminist perspectives have formed the conceptual basis of most of my work.

During my stay at Rimbun Dahan, I will continue to allow these lenses or perspectives to guide my creative process while at the same time fully submerging myself in my new surroundings in the hope of unexpected turns.

You can follow Manuela on her instagram to know more about her works.