Online Visibility for Cultural Practitioners

Online Visibility for Cultural Practitioners

In October 2020, artist and digital marketing professional Rupa Subramaniam conducted a series of workshops for former resident artists at Rimbun Dahan. These workshops were supported by British Council and Yayasan Sime Darby, as one of the Hubs Clinic Grants, part of the Hubs for Good program.

Suddenly art needs to go digital. But what does that really mean? This workshop helped artists pivot to digital through a holistic, conscious approach. It included understanding digital branding, as well as researching potential global audiences using tools like Google Trends, to design successful online art campaigns that can stand alone.

In the three two-hour Zoom sessions, the 18 participants learned to move confidently into the digital sphere.

The workshops were conducted by Rupa Subramaniam, a working artist with extensive professional experience in corporate-level digital media strategy. Read more about the trainer…

We have condensed the main suggestions from the workshop into this handy guide:

Hints & Tips — Increasing Online Visibility [PDF, 374KB]

 

About the Trainer

Rupa Subramaniam (b.1989) is a Malaysian creative professional based in Kuala Lumpur. Since 2014, she has been developing communal art project that get disseminated through digital platforms. She is known for her feminist-themed works, the body painting photography series, “This Body is Mine” and “Antidote” that have reached more than 2 million views worldwide. The exciting ways she uses traditional Indian coloured rice have also appealed to the local ‘hipster’ Instagram audience. Her works, while very accessible, do not sacrifice depth. Her projects have been exhibited in Global Movement of Arts in World Humanities Conference (UNESCO, CIPSH), Belgium, National Arts Gallery of Malaysia and Freedom Film Festival, among others.

Her corporate experience in digital media strategy, since 2009, has required her to conceptualize ideas, execute campaigns and justify advertising reports. Working closely with media partners such as Facebook, Google and YouTube, she has strong insights to develop clear communication messages. She has won numerous advertising awards including Aegis Global Award (Gold, 2012), Malaysia Media Awards for Best Use of Digital Search; Integrated Campaign; Branded Content and Sponsorship (2010 – 2013). Her top clients then include CIMB Bank, Nippon Paint and The Star Media Group.

She is also the founder for Art Battle MY (2016) and volunteers with GoodKids for grass root art classes (2018) to invest in developing young talent.

 

 

Mass Media Training for Arts Makers

Mass Media Training for Arts Makers

In September 2020, arts journalist Sharmilla Ganesan conducted a series of workshops for former resident artists at Rimbun Dahan. These workshops were supported by British Council and Yayasan Sime Darby, as one of the Hubs Clinic Grants, part of the Hubs for Good program.

Communication is essential for art makers, to explain the context and importance of your work to the media and to a general audience. This workshop focused on how to talk about your work and how to get the best out of media interviews. The focus was on making art more accessible to connect with a general audience.

In the four 90-minute Zoom sessions, the 17 participants learned to craft a story around their work.

The workshop was conducted by Sharmilla Ganesan, a culture journalist with almost 14 years of experience, currently the presenter/producer of the arts show Front Row at radio station BFM 89.9. Read more about the trainer…

 

The following video shows highlights from the mock interviews with the participating artists, presenting their work to the general public:

 

We have condensed the main suggestions from the workshop into this handy guide:

Hints & Tips for Mass Media Interviews [PDF, 326KB]

 

About the Trainer

Sharmilla Ganesan is a presenter/producer with BFM 89.9, where she hosts Front Row, the radio station’s arts show. On the programme, she covers the Malaysian arts and culture scene in a variety of ways, including interviews, discussions, analysis, and critical reviews. These encompass the various culture genres, such as performing arts, visual arts, and music. Besides this, she is also the co-host for By the Book (literature), Popcorn Culture (movies and pop culture), and The Daily Digest (current affairs).

Sharmilla is also a writer and critic, with in-depth experience covering and commenting on Malaysian arts and culture. Sharmilla comes from a journalistic background of almost 14 years in Malaysia. She was a features journalist with The Star for over a decade, where she wrote extensively on the arts, books, and film – these included interviews, analytical pieces, news, and reviews. She was also runner-up for the Malaysian Press Institute’s award for Best Column 2016, for her literary column in The Star. She has further been published in, among others, The Atlantic, South China Morning Post, NewNaratif, ArtsEquator, and travel3sixty.

During her time as a Fulbright/Hubert H. Humphrey Fellow in the University of Maryland in 2015/2016, Sharmilla focused on the study of culture journalism, which involved discussions with various arts and media organisations in Maryland, Washington D.C., and New York City. As part of this, she worked with Day Eight, a D.C.-based arts journalism non-profit to assess candidates for an arts-writing fellowship and judge an arts-writing award. Sharmilla continued exploring culture journalism during her Asia Journalism Fellowship at the National University of Singapore in 2017, where she researched the development of the field in Singapore.

 

 

Shiela Samsuri

Shiela Samsuri

Shiela Samsuri, 2020, Wandering Collecting Archiving Unfolding (Unfinished Painting)

Malaysian artist and architect Shiela Samsuri joins us for a month-long residency in August 2020, as part of our Southeast Asian Arts Residency series.

About the Artist

Shiela Samsuri (b. 1989) received her training in architecture. She leads R+, a research unit of GDP Architects, which focuses on ways of living in the changing context of our environment and impact from technology. Shiela is also a visual artist, a parallel trajectory that she believes stems from her postgraduate years understanding the language of lines. Her works have been exhibited at many contemporary art shows such as SH/FT 2019 and a finalist of the Malaysia Emerging Artist Awards 2019. At her best, Shiela is a human being who contemplates aspects such as shadows, sun and skin. She has always thought of projecting them into lyrical poetry, the way the late Sapardi Djoko Damono does, although she can never reach such depth (and she’s okay with it). And so she resorted to writing bullet points, drinking lots of good coffee and curating Spotify playlists. She spent the year 2019 collecting tarmacs around her neighbourhood for introspective reasons, however the year 2020 turns out slightly different than expected…

More info at shielasamsuri.com.

Current Work at Rimbun Dahan

Wandering, Collecting, Archiving, Unfolding

A drawing language exercise where one wanders around Rimbun Dahan, collecting things that have fallen onto the ground, microscoping them to understand their discreet patterns (and sometimes unseen lives), archiving and unfolding them into drawing iterations and narratives.

Before Your Very Eyes (an entry for ArtScience Prize 2020 by Academy of Sciences Malaysia)

A collaboration project with a marine microbiologist that draws upon social stratification as exemplified through microorganisms interaction where different characteristics of water is used as a way to look at boundaries and social class. This is an entry for ArtScience Prize 2020, currently on-going, organised by Academy of Science Malaysia.

1,001

Some things are better left unsaid.

Anna Tan

Anna Tan

Anna Tan is currently undertaking a residency at Rimbun Dahan from August to September 2020.

About the Author

Anna Tan grew up in Malaysia, the country that is not Singapore. She is the author of two fantasy books, Coexist and Dongeng, and has short stories included in various local and international anthologies.

When not writing, Anna is the treasurer for the Malaysian Writers Society and heads the group in her hometown of Penang. This really means that she nags them into turning up for write-ins and critiques, then wrangles them into submitting for NutMag, an annual zine published by MYWriters Penang. Anna was once a certified and chartered accountant with a big 4 firm but has given up on annoying bean counters in general. She now likes to annoy other wordsmiths by correcting their grammar.

In 2019, Anna completed an MA in Creative Writing: The Novel at Brunel University London. She is interested in Malay/Nusantara and Chinese legends and folklore in exploring the intersection of language, culture, and faith. She can be found tweeting as @natzers and forgetting to update annatsp.com.

 

Current Work-in-Progress at Rimbun Dahan

Anna is currently working on the first (millionth) rewrite of The Weight of Sin, the culmination of the Absolution duology.

The first novel, The Weight of Strength, is a high fantasy retelling of Samson and Delilah set in a magical Malaccan Sultanate-esque world that draws on Nusantara culture, language, and imagery. Terang has fallen, its people have been taken captive. Raja Muda Mikal must prove himself and discover a way to liberate his people, even while he struggles with his own faith in a silent God.

The current WIP, The Weight of Sin, follows the restoration of Terang two years on. Mikal, now Sultan, must fulfil the Perjanjian Garam to restore God’s protection over Terang. He sets out on his pilgrimage to Suci with fear in his heart and death in his soul—and the hope that his sacrifice will save his people. Tulen sets out on a similar pilgrimage, seeking absolution for causing the death of her brother. But the road to Suci is fraught with danger—physically, emotionally, and spiritually. Soon, both Mikal and Tulen must decide for themselves: what lengths will they go to in their quests for absolution? The Weight of Sin explores the concept of absolution—and weighs the merits of simply offering sacrifices for atonement versus obedience to the scriptures.

 

Excerpt from The Weight of Sin

Finding a new job is not easy when your ex-boss has circulated your name and crime to all the nearby restaurants. It’s the third morning since I lost my job and I’ve already been rejected by most of the restaurants near my place. I’m also using too much of my money on food. If I’m going to have enough for rent, I’m going to have to turn to drastic measures.

Mak will be so disappointed in me.

I slip into the back of the Temple, ignoring the clamour in my head as the bells toll. If cursed is the hand who kills, then it wouldn’t matter if that same hand also stole, would it? It couldn’t be doubly cursed, could it?

Not here, Tulen, I tell myself. You don’t do anything bad near the Temple nor near the Justice’s Quarters, not where there are dozens of stern-faced women around who know your name and your face and can read your thoughts, no matter how hard you try to mask them.

I concentrate on the Uskup who is droning on ahead, praying to Kudus for the restoration of Terang, while I try to slide shields around my thoughts. Aunty Rahsia taught me this four years ago—the basics of it, at least. She said that it was important for me to learn, especially with the promised strength of my gifts—and then Mak died and Aunty Rahsia got her dream job and disappeared out of our lives, the very way she told Mak off for doing to us. Well, she’s not a blood relative anyway, just Mak’s friend.

It still hurts.

A Justice in front turns around, eyes scanning the crowd and I slam my shields up. I must succeed this time, because her gaze passes over me without pausing. She looks a little puzzled, then turns back to the service.

What did I let slip?

I suppress my thoughts and practice monitoring those of the people around me. The tall, thin man in front of me is wondering if his wife is cheating on him. The lady next to him, whom I assume must be his wife, is trying to calculate if they have enough to pay for their son’s school fees for the next month. The fat lady next to me is thinking about dinner. Hah. Mak Ros, that nosy old bawang, is somewhere on my left, wondering if that degenerate girl is up to no good. My cheeks burn.

Aaaand this is why you don’t eavesdrop on people.

The Uskup mentions Suci and I perk up. He’s praying for Kudus to confirm the appointment of a new Uskup Agung. I frown. Hasn’t he been praying for that for the last six months? I mean, the old one has been dead for almost a year. I know because he died two months after Telus did, just when he was supposed to come to Impian.

When the Uskup starts on Sultan Mikal and the Bayangan Raja, I take that as my cue to leave. It means he’s about to end the service and I don’t want to be caught hanging around by more bawangs who may or may not remember Mak and ask me what I’m up to these days.

Nothing good.

I shut the thought down and slip out of the Temple. My feet take me to the market, partially because I’m hungry, partially because I don’t know where else to go. The crowd in the market is perfect for hiding me, and it’s not where I’d be likely to find a Justice. I work through lifting my shields again, so that no one can read me. I don’t bother trying to add a covering projection, because that takes too much energy and concentration.

And you’re not very good at it.

Shunting that thought aside, I work on listening to the thoughts around me, trying to pick an easy mark. It should be easy, right? And Kudus can’t curse me twice, right? All the Paderis I’ve ever talked to say that all sins are alike to Kudus so if I’ve sinned once…

The fat lady from the Temple crosses in front of me. She looks like an easy mark. She’s still distractedly running through recipes in her head—ooh, curry chicken sounds lovely—whilst tallying the amount she has in her purse—she has a lot of money. Now she’s thinking about whether she should get pastries for the brat, whoever that is, as well. I follow her around the market as discreetly as I can, but can’t seem to find an opening. She keeps her bag too close to her, makes too many unpredictable moves.

I spy a likelier target. My second target proves a better choice. I manage to slip a hand in her basket and score a nice sausage bun. She doesn’t even notice.

With a little more confidence—and practice—I walk away from the market that morning with enough food for the next two days. No money though. My fingers are not that nimble, and it seems that Impianans are more careful with their purses than they are with their shopping bags.

This is only a temporary measure, I remind myself. Once I get a new job, I won’t have to steal anymore. I just need to conserve as much money as I can so that I will still have a place to stay. I don’t doubt that Pak Baik will kick me out the moment I’m late in paying, no matter what his name actually means. I mean, look at the name I got stuck with. You don’t expect a murderer to be called pure.

I spend the rest of the day receiving more job rejections. One even has the audacity to chase me out of his restaurant. Maybe I need to consider a change in careers.

Shadows That Flourish – A Solo Exhibition by Kim Ng

Shadows That Flourish – A Solo Exhibition by Kim Ng

Rimbun Dahan presents
 

Shadows That Flourish

a solo exhibition by Kim Ng

 
DATES: Saturday 11 July to Sunday 2 August
[CLOSED on Friday 31 July for Hari Raya Haji]
 
OPENING HOURS: Weekends 10am – 5pm; Mon to Fri by appointment only (Whatsapp Angela at +6012-210-4229).
ADDRESS: Km. 27 (entrance before Lorong Belimbing), Jalan Kuang 48050 Kuang, Selangor
 
 
Admission is FREE.
You are also welcome to walk around our indigenous Southeast Asian garden and view our heritage houses during your visit.
 

About the Exhibition

 
Influenced by living habits and the environment that we live in, Kim Ng’s work has a strong connection to social experience, human conduct and memory. He collects an abundance of abandoned objects from the street for their aesthetic values and possibilities, taking pictures of the marks, textures and graffiti left by men and nature. To him, those are gestures of storytelling in their pictorial and physical forms. Those traces also indicate the behaviour left behind by someone or something that held the story of the past.
 
The artist residency in Rimbun Dahan provided Kim Ng the opportunity to explore and investigate, rather than being tied down to a fixed direction of excessive production. His exploration in various materials and art forms is related to his experience in art-making. A new level of sensitivity towards the materials and forms has been established during his stay in Rimbun Dahan which allowed him to delve into a much deeper aesthetic awareness through further exploration and encounters with various materials and visual propositions.
 
Shadows That Flourish pulls together Kim Ng’s six months of explorations into a finale and is presented in the Underground Gallery at Rimbun Dahan. Artworks are divided into three types: unprimed canvas buried in the ground or cement, speaking to the transformation of material essence into something that signifies the rural and the urban, and ceramic sculptures and installation works that express nature and social phenomena in a metaphorical way. His colourful mixed media and silkscreen prints on canvas convey a complication of emotional feeling towards the environment. The series of found objects keep track of the authenticity of the materials and their origins, reiterating the existing history of the materials beyond their surface values, and rebuilding their meanings from the past for new interpretations. Much of the thinking process of his art-making was associated with the subject matter, materials and forms, attempting to build a dialogue with the viewers through the visual presentation, and evoking different senses of experience through a variety of materials.
 
Kim Ng is sensitive to the fact that each different material and form has their own voices. He does not particularly highlight the making process through his works, but from the processes of making, he creates symbols and meanings for further communication and dialogue, contributing to the sensual reading of the work on a personal level when one confronts them.

 

Read more about the artist and his residency at Rimbun Dahan >>

This exhibition is supported by Dasein Academy of Art.
 
To request a copy of the electronic catalogue, please email Kim at kng341@gmail.com.

INSIDE OUT — A Performative Exhibition by Isabelle Schad

INSIDE OUT — A Performative Exhibition by Isabelle Schad

Created by choreographer Isabelle Schad, winner of the 2019 German Dance Prize.
Co-created and performed by dancers from Europe and Southeast Asia.

In her performative exhibition INSIDE OUT Isabelle Schad shows choreographic sculptures that are experienced in their powerfully sensuous moving forms. Her work situates itself between dance and visual art, draws on her ongoing fascination with Aikido-Zen, community building and her long-term collaboration with visual artist and philosopher Laurent Goldring. With subtle exactness, the performers form bodies and movement into sculptures which define their own space and evolve a contemplative quality. INSIDE OUT is conceived to be re-created anew for each venue and will be seen for the first time with this unique constellation of dancers coming from Europe and Southeast Asia.

Performers: Claudia Tomasi (Italy), Przemek Kamiński (Poland), Josh Marcy (Indonesia), Noutnapha Soydala (Laos), Vidura Amranand (Thailand), Nguyen Thanh Chung (Vietnam), Nicole Primero (Philippines), Gebbvelle Ray Selga (Philippines), Jereh Leung (Singapore), and Lau Beh Chin (Malaysia).
Artistic Assistance: Claudia Tomasi (Italy)
Music: Damir Simunovic (Croatia)
Lighting: Emma Juliard (France)

DETAILS

8:30pm
Friday 15 Nov, Saturday 16 Nov & Sunday 17 Nov
White Box, MAP Publika

TICKETS

Tickets walk-in by donation at the door:
RM35 regular
RM20 students/seniors/concession
Group discount: 4 student entries for RM70 (RM17.50 each)

Please wear comfortable shoes and be prepared to stand and move around during the performance.

REGISTRATION

If you are bringing a big group, or concerned about limited places, please register with your name, number of people attending, and date of attendance, by email to arts@rimbundahan.org or Whatsapp +60 17-727 7137. Your registered space will be saved until 8:15pm on the day of the performance.

CREDITS

Jointly Organized by Goethe-Institut and Rimbun Dahan

Supported by the NATIONALES PERFORMANCE NETZ International Guest Performance Fund for Dance, which is funded by the Federal Government Commissioner for Culture and the Media.
Funded by Berlin Senate Department for Culture and Europe.
Venue Supported by MAP Publika/UEMS Sunrise
Special Thanks to the Embassy of the Republic of France in Malaysia.

Photo by D.Hartwig

Contemporary Dance/Traditional Rhythms Workshop by Annalouise Paul

Contemporary Dance/Traditional Rhythms Workshop by Annalouise Paul

Australian dancer-choreographer Annalouise Paul, the current resident choreographer at Rimbun Dahan, will conduct a 3-hour workshop open to the local performance community.

Annalouise will share choreographic repertoire and a contemporary dance warm up which intersects with Flamenco dance and traditional rhythms. She will share her process of DanceDNA for distilling traditions in order to explore new pathways for movement without disrupting or negating the essence of the cultural form. The workshop will include task work and improvisational modes.

For intermediate/advanced dancers and performers.

6:30-9:30pm
Monday 9 Sept 2019
KOTAK, Five Arts Centre, 27 & 27A Lorong Datuk Sulaiman 7,
Taman Tun Dr Ismail, 60000 Kuala Lumpur.
Google maps: https://goo.gl/maps/vBy1ACMcFCH2

Entrance is RM20 per person, payable at the door. Places are limited and REGISTRATION IS REQUIRED. To register, please email bhijjas@gmail.com or Whatsapp +6017 310 3769 with your name, mobile number and email address.

Please wear clothes comfortable for dancing. Most of the work will be in bare feet. If you have a traditional dance practice of your own, please feel free to bring any required items, i.e. bells, shoes…

About Annalouise Paul

Annalouise Paul is a contemporary-flamenco choreographer and performer from Australia whose works explore identity and transformation through the intersection of contemporary and traditional forms.

Annalouise has been working in the field of intercultural dance in Australia and internationally for over thirty years. More recently she has developed choreographic tools to push dance hybridity. There is no established ‘method’ for creating cross-cultural movement or for practitioners to model from, so there has been slow but constant emergence of process and vocabulary, evolving out of a pool of processes for various works. ‘Hidden Rhythms’ is one process that employs traditional rhythms for shifting the dynamic of dance movement. ‘Dance DNA’ is the most recent method Annalouise has been investigating largely through workshops internationally and in Australia. She has held cross cultural workshops in Singapore, France, India, Melbourne and Sydney supported by World Dance Alliance, Create NSW and Critical Path.

Developing cross-cultural and hybrid processes with local dance artists at Rimbun Dahan, Annalouise is researching and creating material for new interdisciplinary works ‘Mother Tongue’ and ‘Self Portrait’, exploring the existence of multiple cultural affinities, histories and languages in the single body.

Annalouise is the recipient of the Australian Arts in Asia Award in Dance. This Creative Exchange at Rimbun Dahan is supported by Asialink Arts and the NSW Government through Create NSW.

About Rimbun Dahan

Rimbun Dahan is a private arts centre owned by architect Hijjas Kasturi and his wife Angela. The 14-acre compound contains contemporary and traditional buildings in an indigenous Southeast Asian tropical garden. Since 1994, the Cultural Programme at Rimbun Dahan has hosted hundreds of artists across disciplines, spending up to 12 months at Rimbun Dahan to develop their arts practice.

Thanks to FIVE ARTS CENTRE for their venue support.

Photo above, of ‘Mother Tongue’ choreographed by Annalouise Paul, taken by Shane Rozario.

Australian Choreographer Invites Collaborators

Australian Choreographer Invites Collaborators
Want to explore the process of creating cross-cultural dance? Australian choreographer Annalouise Paul is looking for collaborators for her residency at Rimbun Dahan in August 2019!
Ingin mengkaji proses mencipta tarian bersilang budaya? Ahli koreografer Annalouise Paul dari Australia memohon para kolaborator menyertai residensinya di Rimbun Dahan, pada bulan Ogos 2019. Turun ke versi BM –>

Annalouise Paul Residency at Rimbun Dahan

Dates: 15-30 August 2019

Australian dancer-choreographer Annalouise Paul is looking for local dancer artists to collaborate on a cross-cultural dance exchange at Rimbun Dahan, Malaysia.

Callout for Collaborators

WHO: Dancers and choreographers who have a traditional or indigenous dance background (in any culture) are invited to apply. If you are interested in contemporary performance, making new work and challenging traditional concepts or have some experience with contemporary dance that is useful, but not essential.

WHAT: Annalouise Paul will teach excerpts from her existing works and guide artists to explore and develop new choreographic material working from their traditional dances and share her creative practice. Together we will hone a process that uses traditional dances, rhythms and concepts in structured improvisations, and if time permits develop a short choreography that can be shared in a studio showing at the end of the residency.

WHY: Sharing dialogue is key to this exchange. Feeding back on how processes can be pushed further and develop processes for making new works. And as a group, discuss contemporary and traditional dance vocabularies, cultural identity, race, languages, migration and diasporic lineages as artist-makers.

THINGS TO KNOW:

  • Conversations in the studio will be in English, but we will try to accommodate those with minimal English, wherever possible.
  • Video, photographic and written documentation by Annalouise is essential, but this will not be shared publicly, and used only for Annalouise’s artistic archives and grant reports.
  • Consent forms will be provided.
  • Artists are custodians of their traditional practices at all times and decide what cultural material is offered in the exploratory process and for group discussion.
  • Musicians are welcome in this choreographic lab.

YOUR COMMITMENT:

  • Collaborators will be invited to spend 4-5 days per week for 2 weeks, between [date] and [date] working as a group with Annalouise in the studio at Rimbun Dahan.
  • Schedules for working days will be arranged in consultation with the collaborators so that a small group can work together consistently over the period to have maximum benefit for everyone involved.
  • Times will be between 10-5pm TBC, and this will be confirmed once the collaborators are confirmed.
  • Once accepted, continuity is compulsory for the entire group. If you cannot commit for the full period please state this at the start with your best dates and times available.

FEE: There is no fee offered, however, a daily stipend will be offered to cover transport and lunch meals.

CONTACT: If you’re interested please arrange a time to speak with Annalouise Paul. Contact her directly on Whatsapp +61 408664199 or email annalouisempaul@gmail.com with your available dates and times and for more information about the project.

MORE ABOUT ANNALOUISE PAUL

Annalouise Paul has been working in the field of intercultural dance in Australia and internationally for over thirty years. More recently she has developed choreographic tools to push dance hybridity. There is no established ‘method’ for creating cross-cultural movement or for practitioners to model from, so there has been slow but constant emergence of process and vocabulary, evolving out of a pool of processes for various works. ‘Hidden Rhythms’ is one process that employs traditional rhythms for shifting the dynamic of dance movement. ‘Dance DNA’ is the most recent method Annalouise has been investigating largely through workshops internationally and in Australia. She has held cross cultural workshops in Singapore, France, India, Melbourne and Sydney supported by World Dance Alliance, Create NSW and Critical Path.

Annalouise’s residency at Rimbun Dahan in 2019 is an Asialink Arts Creative Exchange.

 

Residensi oleh Annalouise Paul di Rimbun Dahan

Tarikh: 15-30 hb Ogos 2019

Annalouise Paul, seorang penari dan koreografer dari Australia, menjemput artis tari tempatan dari Malaysia untuk menyertai proses kolaborasi dalam sebuah projek pertukaran budaya tari bertempat di Rimbun Dahan.

Jemputan Kepada Kolaborator

SIAPA: Penari atau koreografer yang mempunyai latarbelakang tari tradisi ataupun tarian Orang Asal (daripada budaya mana-mana pun) dijemput membuat permohonan untuk menyertai projek ini. Kami juga menggalakkan permohonan anda jikalau anda pernah terlibat di dalam persembahan jenis kontemporari, terlibat di dalam proses mencipta karya baru yang mencabar konsep-konsep tradisi, ataupun mempunyai sebarang pengalaman di dalam tarian kontemporari.

APA: Annalouise Paul akan mengajar beberapa petikan daripada karya tarinya, dan akan memberi panduan kepada peserta-peserta untuk meneroka dan mengembangkan bahan koreografi yang baru, dengan menggunakan tarian tradisi mereka. Annalouise juga akan kongsi amalan kreatifnya sendiri. Peserta-peserta bersama-sama dengan Annalouise akan menetapkan sebuah proses yang menggunakan pergerakan, rentak dan konsep-konsep daripada tarian tradisi di dalam improvisasi-improvisasi yang berstruktur. Terpulang kepada masa, peserta-peserta juga akan mencipta sebuah koreografi pendek yang akan dipersembahkan kepada orang ramai semasa sebuah pertunjukan di dalam studio pada hujung residensi.

MENGAPA: Berkongsi melalui dialog merupakan kunci proses pertukaran ini. Proses ini juga melibatkan tindakan maklumbalas bagaimana ia boleh diperluaskan dan digunakan untuk mencipta karya yang baru. Sebagai sebuah kumpulan penggiat-penggiat seni, kami akan membincangkan vokabulari tari, identiti budaya, bangsa, bahasa, migrasi dan penyebaran warisan.

HARAP MAKLUM:

  • Perbincangan di dalam studio akan dijalankan di dalam Bahasa Inggeris, tetapi kami akan cuba menampung sesiapa yang kurang fasih di dalam Bahasa Inggeris.
  • Annalouise sering menggunakan sistem dokumentasi proses itu melalui video dan foto serta penulisan, tetapi bahan-bahan tersebut tidak akan dipamerkan secara terbuka, dan hanya digunakan di dalam arkib seni Annalouise serta laporan dana.
  • Borang persetujuan akan disediakan.
  • Peserta-peserta merupakan penjaga budaya tradisi mereka sendiri semasa proses ini. Mereka bertanggungjawab untuk menetapkan sumber tradisi yang boleh atau tidak boleh digunakan semasa proses penerokaan artistik dan perbincangan secara berkumpulan ini.
  • Pemain muzik juga digalakkan menyertai projek ini.

KOMITMENT ANDA:

  • Peserta-peserta dijemput untuk berada di studio di Rimbun Dahan selama 4-5 hari setiap minggu selama dua minggu, di antara tarikh [ ] dan [ ], bekerja berkumpulan bersama-sama dengan Annalouise.
  • Jadual waktu bagi setiap hari di dalam studio akan diatur setelah perundingan dengan peserta-peserta. Kami inginkan sebuah kumpulan kecil yang boleh bekerja bersama-sama dengan cara yang konsisten semasa jangka masa tersebut, untuk memberi faedah yang maksimum kepada semua yang terlibat.
  • Masa di dalam studio adalah lebih kurang di antara pukul 10 pagi dan 5 petang, tetapi waktu sebenarnya akan ditetapkan nanti, setelah peserta-peserta dipilih.
  • Setelah peserta-peserta yang terpilih mengesahkan penyertaan mereka, kehadiran adalah wajib. Jikalau anda tidak dapat memberi komitment yang sepenuhnya, sila mengemukakan jadual waktu anda semasa proses permohonan.

BAYARAN: Tiada bayaran yang ditawarkan, kecuali penghargaan sebanyak RM35 sehari yang akan diberi untuk membantu menanggung kos pengangkutan dan makanan.

HUBUNGI KAMI: Untuk membuat permohonan untuk menyertai projek ini, sila Whatsapp +61 408664199 atau emel annalouisempaul@gmail.com dengan jadual waktu anda yang boleh lapangkan untuk projek ini. Annalouise akan menetapkan masa untuk berbincang dengan lebih lanjut bersama anda secara individu.

MAKLUMAT MENGENAI ANNALOUISE PAUL

Annalouise Paul mempunyai sejenis siasatan koreografi yang timbul daripada kekurangan metodologi yang wujud untuk mencipta pergerakan silang budaya (cross-cultural). Amalan Annalouise berdasarkan proses yang perlahan tetapi berterusan untuk mencipta vokabulari pergerakan. Prosesnya termasuk ‘Hidden Rhythms’ yang menggunakan irama tradisi untuk mengalihkan dinamik pergerakan tarian, dan ‘Dance DNA’ yang menggunakan pergerakan tradisional dengan pendekatan somatik. Beliau telah membangunkan proses-proses ini di Singapura, Perancis, India, Melbourne dan Sydney, disokong oleh institusi-institusi seperti World Dance Alliance, Create NSW dan Critical Path.

Residensi Annalouise di Rimbun Dahan pada tahun 2019 merupakan sebuah Asialink Arts Creative Exchange.

Natalie Labriola

Natalie Labriola

Natalie Labriola is a multidisciplinary artist based out of Los Angeles who will be joining us in May as our Open Residency Artist. An MFA Bard Graduate from Milton Avery Graduate School of the Arts, Natalie’s work is rooted in sculpture but includes drawing, painting, video and clothing.

My work is a material investigation into the nexus between science and magic, between medicine and art. The limits of the physical body and the universal desire for its transcendence — both in mundane and esoteric ways — serve as inspiration for my varied works. The sense of alienation produced by living in a capitalist society gives rise to my desire to imagine new modes of claiming subjectivity, and at the same time, a desire to imagine a deeper sense of collectivity.

From the psychic, vibrational frequencies in the environment to the contemplation of what it means to be healthy not just individually, but as a societal collective, Natalie’s work explore these little bridges between our body, our mind and how we affect and care about one another.

 

Find out more about Natalie’s work at www.natalielabriola.biz and also www.talisclothing.com.

 

Dipika Mukherjee

Dipika Mukherjee

Dipika Mukherjee (Malaysia) is an author and sociolinguist. Her work, focusing on the politics of modern Asian societies and diaspora, is internationally renown. In the past years, she has given a keynote at the Asia Pacific Writers and Translators Conference (Bali, 2017), juried at the Neustadt International Literary Festival (USA, 2018), spoken at the Hearth Festival (Wales, 2018) and the Singapore Writers Festival (Singapore, 2017); she has also given public talks at the University of Stockholm (Sweden, 2018) and the International Institute of Asian Studies (Netherlands, 2017).

I have a very personal stake in telling Malaysian stories, especially those that promote social justice. I believe that the growing intolerance of our world today (in Malaysia, India, and the US) requires voices to advocate for tolerance with stories that span our imperfect, violent world and not merely shine a light on a particular region or nation or race.

Ode to Broken Things, Dipika’s Man Asia Literary Prize-longlisted debut novel, is set against the religious and ethnic conflicts simmering in politics and explores notions of nationalism and citizenship in Malaysia.

During her residency here at Rimbun Dahan, Dipika will be conducting a workshop called A Picture; A Thousand Words. Reviewing ekphrasis (the art of writing about images), this workshop will look at how art has inspired writers in the past by focusing on writing inspired by paintings and imagery. Then participants will review a number of Malaysian visual art on display at the Rimbun Dahan gallery to write poems and short prose. All writing levels welcome.