Ulrike Johannsen

Ulrike Johannsen

Ulrike Johannsen is from Vienna and our resident artist under the Open Residency Program for August 2018. She graduated from the Academy of Fine Arts, Vienna and have been actively creating and exhibiting works as well as receiving awards, grants and residencies all over the world. Ulrike is currently teaching in KunstModeDesign Herbststrasse and was a guest teacher and artist in several schools around the world.

In my installations, objects and paper works I question the promises of happiness and tempting offerings of our consumer oriented lifestyle. Quoting, processing and manipulating the language of our popular media and culture industry, I try to make the gap visible between our needs and desires and the seduction of consumer-capitalist promises. I am interested in how the collective construction of society and culture functions and how we negotiate and communicate these different perceptions.

Ulrike’s current work is a series of sculptures and small installations which are dealing with Love and Erotics in times of capitalism. Eva Illouz’s notion of sexual capital understandable as part of the economical capital as well as Pierre Bourdieu’s notion of Habitus and Byung Chul Han’s considerations about the idea of beauty do inform her work.

Ulrike runs her own art space called Clubclub and you can check out her website and instagram to learn more about her and her work.

Lauren Lee

Lauren Lee

Lauren Jeyoon Lee was born in Maryland, USA and moved to South Korea when she as four. She spent most of her teenage years in Singapore and returned to USA to receive her education in Fine Arts. Lauren is currently a grad student from Yale University and is spending three weeks in Rimbun Dahan as an Open Residency artist. Lauren’s a sculptor who works with found objects and clay. Her working process heavily involves writing that are often reduced as titles to inform and create narratives for visual elements.

A pair of large plastic breasts labeled “Super Droopers.”
A two feet long rubber chew toy with orange bulbs on both ends.
A red SOLO cup full of half-thawed chicken feet.
A bag full of Joshua Nelson’s beard.
A petri dish with mice fetuses.
A burnt-out glue gun with strands of blonde hair around it.
Aqua beads soaked in black vinegar.
A picture of my five-year-old-self crying with chewing gum glued over my boobs. A plastic bag of flesh toned cosmetic sponges.

A bag of make-up sponges sold for $1.29. I opened it and took a sniff. It smelled like my mother’s pillow. My mother spent every Sunday night with me. She would leave my grandparents’ house the next morning for work. I always believed I could cling on to her. It never worked. My grandfather would wake me up instead in his bright blue sweatpants that smelled like his medicine cabinet. So I would bury my face in my mother’s pillowcase to smell her instead. My grandfather would then carry me to the living room and lay me down on a leather sofa. It felt cold even on summer days. That was my Monday morning until I grew tall enough to realize how childish it is to feel that empty.

I have been reliving my childhood since then. Hiding behind the weight of cultural and religious issues, I laughed at traditional values imposed on me and unresolved resentment the Korean War had left on my grandparents. When I moved to Singapore in sixth grade, I witnessed my mother’s loneliness as a woman away from her lover. When I came to America, I witnessed middle-aged adults, self-proclaimed children of God, be possessed with petty jealousy over the death of a family member. I now maliciously poke fun at the emotional conflicts and complex feelings adults engaged in, with different materials, from a glamorous piece of bronze to a cheap clump of fake hair.

So I started collecting. I collect cheap things that trigger feelings of shame; humiliation; regret; disgust; and sometimes humor. I frequent local dollar stores, beauty supplies, pet shops and sex shops to rummage through things. Some give me immediate answers and others have eldritch noise. I spend time with them. I wrestle with them. Most of them are willing to work with me at first. They would bend, squish, tear and bond themselves, as I demand. Soon they start to rebel. They straighten themselves up, separate from the others and refuse to be put back together. Like a frustrated, demented child, I angrily pierce, nail, shove and tighten them. Some give in, others refuse. They are awkwardly and precariously put together. I see myself in them, insignificant and small, yet screaming to validate my existence to someone.

During her stay in Rimbun Dahan, Lauren plans to create assemblages and drawings specific to this place, informed by the interactions with people, locals and expats that she’ll meet. Lauren will be with us throughout July 2018.

Carlos Carvalho

Carlos Carvalho

Originally from Brazil, in the last three years Carlos Carvalho has been living in Asia, first India, now in Indonesia. Using crafts techniques and everyday materials, like textiles (mostly felt), paper, cardboard and paint, he builds topographies. Those topographies are found through the combination and juxtaposition of shapes cast from his body. His process is time consuming and repetitive, almost meditative.

My body is the center of my work, my body is queer and I’m gay. Thinking queerness in places where it’s not welcome or allowed is what is going through my mind. Especially because Brazil is also facing a conservative wave right now that is pressing against women, LGBTIs and the African-Brazilian population.

At Rimbun Dahan, being in the middle of all this green I wonder about things that hide in the vegetation, in the bushes. Being mostly by myself, this also brings about the idea that things that we fear hide in the dark, among the plants. I decided to play with the idea of camouflage as a starting point, as we can think of animals that hide. I mock the hunter animal print over the casts taken from my own body – I fear they are part of each of us, that they are constituents of our minds. This is supposed to be a turning point of the dynamics of fear. The body parts originating from the queer-gay body to become the element that hides and hunts, I put the body in a position of power and control, which is what the queer body needs to have in today’s reality.

Find more of Carlos’s work at his website, and his instagram accounts: @carhencarvalho and @carloscarvalhoart

Morganne Mazeika and Zach Khoo

Morganne Mazeika and Zach Khoo

apparatus dance collective, consisting of dancer-choreographers Morganne Mazeika and Zach Khoo are currently at Rimbun Dahan developing a new work called “discussions with”. The intention with the residency is to explore human interaction through a physical means of communication. Their method of movement invention is extrapolated into a thematic focus of the work: how does one communicate.

As the founders of apparatus they attended The University of Texas at Austin. During their time there they danced in the projects and residencies of established international choreographers. Their research that led to the creation of the company began in the studio that gave way to their current process; incorporating multidisciplinary approaches into dance and the method of dialoguing movement.

At their recent open studio, they spoke about collaborating long distance by sending each other videos of themselves dancing, and how to now translate that exchange through verbal and nonverbal communication when in the same physical space.

 

Christopher Strong

Christopher Strong

During my residency I will continue my recent practice of finding small instances of beauty in every day life and magnifying it. By limiting my focus to a tiny space, I can find shapes, forms and colours that always around me but not often the focus of me attention. Usually my subject is nature thriving within an urban environment, but sometimes I focus on food or industry.

During my residency I want a new artistic experience by letting the environment change my work, both in the subject matters that will capture my attention as I live at Rimbun Dahan and travel in Kuala Lumpur, and how the physical environment that is very different to Melbourne.

I am a self-taught visual artist, painting with oils and watercolour. See more information about me and my work at my website.

Flor Alba

Flor Alba

Mirage catcher, graduate of Geneva School of Art and Design/Haute Ecole d’Art et de Design (HEAD) in 2012, Flor Alba draws and paints according to her aesthetic inclinations and contemplative imagination. Zig-zag wanderings. Surveying the contradictions of beauty, she feels the surface of humans, then dissects them. She works with oil paints, water colours, embroidery, pencil, and greasy chalk.

Neo-fauvistic chromatic surgery. Engulfed in pure and violent colors, forms sometimes blend into a cluster of graphic ornaments and unexpected scenography. Yet beings remain in the foreground, stripped of their earthly envelopes, letting go of the memories of past gestures: fragments of ancestral stories. The culture of ethnic rituals is the heart of her creative quest. She seeks to own pieces of life, objects and rites of no fixed origins, reinterpreting her own story in that mirror. She questions others, expanding civilizations, what is foreign to us and seems strange to us, as a way to question her own origins.

Flor’s artistic references are:

  • Matisse for his colours and repetitions
  • Gauguin for his freedom in colour
  • Lynette Yadom-Boakye for her portaits
  • Satsuki Shibuya for her abstract lightness
  • Marta Riniker-Radich for her acid colours in her original compositions
  • Karine Rougier for her stunning scenes

Flor will be in residency at Rimbun Dahan from mid-July to mid-September 2017. Check out more of her work on her website and Instagram.

Jeannette and Michel Lambert

Jeannette and Michel Lambert

Michel Lambert is an accomplished jazz drummer, composer and visual artist. He is currently working on a series of visual scores, collages and drawings combined with music that will eventually be performed by improvising musicians as well as classical trios. Jeannette Lambert is a jazz vocalist and multi-media artist who uses active dreamwork in her creative process (click here to see one of her works, Dream Haiku). She uses intuitive techniques to write poetry that is then performed by her trio which includes Michel Lambert and her brother, jazz guitarist Reg Schwager. Currently she is studying the idea that dreams, imagination and improvised music all inhabit the same space. They are both based in Montreal, Canada.

During their residency in July, Jeannette and Michel will gather ideas and inspiration from the surroundings and work on compositions and artwork for their upcoming performance later in the month in Toraja, Sulawesi. They are joined in their stay by their two sons who are also highly artistic, both in music and visual art, like their parents. As a family, they love to travel for inspiration and collaboration while dedicating their time to creating art. In previous summers they have attended artist residencies in Paris, Barcelona and Italy.

Jeannette, Michel and Reg have a musical collective called Jazz from Rant and have produced over 50 recordings of jazz and improvised music. Raised in Canada, Jeannette and Reg are from Dutch Indonesian parents and many of Jeannette’s songs reflect this cultural identity. Michel is from Quebec City, descended from a family of many classical musicians and composers and he draws on this background for many of his orchestral works.

For more information on their projects and creative ideas you can visit Jeannette’s website and Michel’s website. Jeannette, Michel and Reg gratefully acknowledge the support of the Canada Council for the Arts, which last year invested $153 million to bring the arts to Canadians throughout the country.

"Walter’s offerings” – Jeannette's photo of the fruit and nuts picked from Rimbun Dahan’s herb garden

“Walter’s offerings” – Jeannette’s photo of the fruit and nuts picked from Rimbun Dahan’s herb garden

Canada Council for the Arts logo

Stephen Eastaugh

Stephen Eastaugh

Stephen Eastaugh is a mixed media visual artist with severe wanderlust as over the past few decades, he has traveled to over ninety countries scattered across all continents. While on the road he has managed to present over one hundred solo exhibitions in a wide range of venues. Studios have been set up on a Russian icebreaker at the North Pole, in a science building one winter in Antarctica, and many places in-between. On three occasions the artist has been awarded the Australian Antarctic Arts Fellowship along with numerous art residencies, awards and grants. Travel is the artist’s muse as over the past thirty years, rarely has Eastaugh stayed longer than four months in any single location. It is interesting to see all his work as strange maps or landscapes where he attempts to both locate and lose himself simultaneously.

His work is primarily landscape derived, either representational, symbolic or connected to experiences and objects picked up while on the road. There is a strong textural element which ranges from damaged paper to thick paint and currently, embroidery is utilized. In mid 2017 Eastaugh will plant himself at Rimbun Dahan in Malaysia to explore new work in a new longitude and latitude.

Eastaugh’s work can be found in the National Gallery of Australia, state galleries across Australia, the Nevada Museum of Art, USA and private collections worldwide. In 2017 the artist will be exhibiting in Melbourne, Sydney and Amsterdam as well as working in temporary studios in Argentina, Norway and elsewhere.

You can find more of his work on his website.

Sabine Reindel

Sabine Reindel

Sabine Reindel is a German-born fine art painter, whose work concentrates on cityscapes. During her six-weeks residency at Rimbun Dahan she will continue her series of cityscapes she has started to create while she was practicing law as an attorney in the United Arab Emirates. Thereafter she continued working on cityscapes in San Francisco where she earned her master of fine art at the Academy of Art University, in New York where she studied at the New York Academy and the Artist Students League of New York, and in artist residencies in Thailand, Singapore and France.

My art is about journeys, exploring new places and making them my own. My work concentrates on cityscapes of the United Arab Emirates, where I practiced law for the last eighteen years, San Francisco, where I received my education in art, New York, where I took classes at the New York Academy of Art and the Arts Students League of New York, Thailand, Singapore and France where I had artist residencies over the last two years.

My first calling has not been art. I went to law school in Germany and then worked as an attorney in the Emirates of Dubai and Abu Dhabi. Over the last two decades I moved a lot and I lived in thriving places that changed and still change a lot. With my paintings I try to explore the similarities of these places, but mostly concentrate on the differences. Each place has its unique architecture, which reflects its own unique location on the globe, its special light, its one of a kind flora and fauna. Seeing what make each place so unique makes painting for me so exciting.

Richard Orjis

Richard Orjis

Richard Orjis is a multimedia artist based in New Zealand, as well as a PhD student from the Auckland University of Technology. He will be at Rimbun Dahan for a three month residency from February to April thanks to a grant from Asia New Zealand Foundation. To find out more about him and his work, you can visit his website.

My artistic research is driven by an interest in the garden and how I might understand place through these green spaces. I see gardens as exciting and complex intersections of art, nature and culture. They can offer insight into how a culture views the natural world, aesthetics, politics, religion, gender and class.

The proposed project for my time at Rimbun Dahan will be the production of publication containing photographs, text and drawings which be created in response to the green spaces of area. The project will encompass the breadth of the local environment, from the manicured to the accidental, from the civic to the domestic. It takes the premise that a city like Kuala Lumpur could be perceived as a vast garden with a functioning ecology of people, animals, plants and elements.

Grass Circle, a concrete edged circle of grass permitted to grow for one year at Te Tuhi Centre for the Arts addressed the perception of suburb and notions of control.

The Apron, a temporary art project “exploring the history of meadows and wildflowers and how they can change the way we think about urban green spaces.” Commissioned by Tauranga Art Gallery for the Bay of Plenty Garden and Art Festival.

Walking In Trees, a two-storey scaffolding bridge and staircase erected between a pair of historic Moreton Bay Figs in Albert Park examined notions of perception.