Molly Murphy

Molly Murphy

Molly Murphy is a visual artist from Lawrence Kansas. Her current work deals with cycles of life and death as they exist in the interconnected systems between humans and the natural world. Shared Biology is an ongoing series of abstract landscapes intertwining lush plant life and waterways with lines of human interventions.

This series was born of my own anxieties about adherence to prescribed social systems and anthropogenic existence. With suggestions of artificially drawn boundaries obscured within tangled and overlapping patterns, the line between existence and memory is blurred. Thee works push an uncomfortable beauty and vibrancy, while considering our very short time in this place and what we will leave behind.

Molly will be our Open Residency artist for August 2019. While at Rimbun Dahan, she will be working in the studio with her three year old daughter, and will continue her series titled “Shared Biology.” During her residency, she will be focusing on water media and cut paper rather than oil paintings she is more noted for.

Visit her website for more information about the artist and her works.

Jessica Niles DeHoff

Jessica Niles DeHoff

Jessica Niles DeHoff (born 1978, California) is a visual artist and writer living in Beijing, China.  Drawing from her earlier career in architecture and urban planning, her work dramatizes interactions between individuals and their social, cultural, and spatial environments.  Jessica holds degrees from Harvard University and Yale School of Architecture, and she has taught design at universities in Japan, China, and the USA. Her current project is an illustrated book of poetry.

Jessica is here for the month of July as our Open Residency artist. She’ll be working on abstract interpretations of Chinese, Himalayan and Southeast Asian decorative motifs.

Over the past year and half, I’ve been traveling a lot around the edges of the Chinese world: the Himalayas, the Tibetan plateau, Central Asia and Southeast Asia.  I’m looking forward to my residency period as a chance to digest all the images and information I’ve accumulated on these travels, identifying some elements of a shared visual language and experimenting with the decorative elements that are common to the larger region.

You can view more of Jessia’s works at her Instagram, Website and Minted.

 

Natalie Labriola

Natalie Labriola

Natalie Labriola is a multidisciplinary artist based out of Los Angeles who will be joining us in May as our Open Residency Artist. An MFA Bard Graduate from Milton Avery Graduate School of the Arts, Natalie’s work is rooted in sculpture but includes drawing, painting, video and clothing.

My work is a material investigation into the nexus between science and magic, between medicine and art. The limits of the physical body and the universal desire for its transcendence — both in mundane and esoteric ways — serve as inspiration for my varied works. The sense of alienation produced by living in a capitalist society gives rise to my desire to imagine new modes of claiming subjectivity, and at the same time, a desire to imagine a deeper sense of collectivity.

From the psychic, vibrational frequencies in the environment to the contemplation of what it means to be healthy not just individually, but as a societal collective, Natalie’s work explore these little bridges between our body, our mind and how we affect and care about one another.

 

Find out more about Natalie’s work at www.natalielabriola.biz and also www.talisclothing.com.

 

Johanne Lykke

Johanne Lykke

Johanne Lykke is a Danish visual artist living and working in Copenhagen, Denmark. Johanne is with us in February as an Open Residency artist.

“I work with a feminist approach towards abstract painting exploring the idea of the feminine, its materiality and the meeting between feminine and masculine art traditions. Through monumental spray paintings and watercolours I investigate a soft, transparent materiality in painting on paper. With a minimalist use of the spray paint, I challenge its wellknown grafitti aesthetics. In watercolours, I work with immediate, fluidity which, through its scale, aim to question the medium’s associations to its amateur, lower status in the art world as well as a “ladies’ medium”.

As an artist-in-residence at Rimbun Dahan, I wish to expand my western perspective by exploring the Malaysian color traditions and batik techniques. I will be researching connections to the idea of the feminine in South-East Asian visual cultures and hope to find new inspiration during my stay as well as creating a dialogue between eastern and westerns perspective on femininity in art.”

You can check out the artist’s instagram here.

Iliaeb Duo

Iliaeb Duo

The Iliaeb duo was founded by a choreographer, performer and visual artist, Ilia Gilbertas, and Etienne Bernardot, a visual artist using the digital tool. They gathered around the idea of confronting the body with the digital, to appropriate this tool through art, to get it out of an exclusively virtual world through the body. It is in this sense that the duo invests in a reflection on this medium to ultimately build a digital education. In addition to the performances of their creations, the duo hosts workshops around them. They also participate in Open Workshops. The duo believes in the need to develop a critical thinking about digital and its evolution, both on the side of Big Data and the commercialization of data, than on the side of the body and what it may involve.

The duo comes to Rimbun Dahan as Open Residency artists in October 2018 to work on the first stage of their project, [Substrat]. It is a performance in situ, visual and evolving, directly related to the geographical environment and the proposals of the musician / s, and performer / s. The essence of this project is the meeting of various artistic and cultural worlds. It is a piece destined to travel, to evolve, to grow as and when meetings and places. Beyond performance, [Substrat] is thought of as a means of exchange. Each city visited, each artist met, will leave a trace, a testimony for the following. That’s why the basic devices—one  computer, one camera, two video projectors and to pairs of hands—are so lightweight. Visual creation is done live by manipulating objects, materials, light and images generated by the computer. The camera captures this manipulation and projects it on screen, or video mapping on building.

You can check out more about their works on their website, Facebook or Vimeo.

Ulrike Johannsen

Ulrike Johannsen

Ulrike Johannsen is from Vienna and our resident artist under the Open Residency Program for August 2018. She graduated from the Academy of Fine Arts, Vienna and have been actively creating and exhibiting works as well as receiving awards, grants and residencies all over the world. Ulrike is currently teaching in KunstModeDesign Herbststrasse and was a guest teacher and artist in several schools around the world.

In my installations, objects and paper works I question the promises of happiness and tempting offerings of our consumer oriented lifestyle. Quoting, processing and manipulating the language of our popular media and culture industry, I try to make the gap visible between our needs and desires and the seduction of consumer-capitalist promises. I am interested in how the collective construction of society and culture functions and how we negotiate and communicate these different perceptions.

Ulrike’s current work is a series of sculptures and small installations which are dealing with Love and Erotics in times of capitalism. Eva Illouz’s notion of sexual capital understandable as part of the economical capital as well as Pierre Bourdieu’s notion of Habitus and Byung Chul Han’s considerations about the idea of beauty do inform her work.

Ulrike runs her own art space called Clubclub and you can check out her website and instagram to learn more about her and her work.

Lauren Lee

Lauren Lee

Lauren Jeyoon Lee was born in Maryland, USA and moved to South Korea when she as four. She spent most of her teenage years in Singapore and returned to USA to receive her education in Fine Arts. Lauren is currently a grad student from Yale University and is spending three weeks in Rimbun Dahan as an Open Residency artist. Lauren’s a sculptor who works with found objects and clay. Her working process heavily involves writing that are often reduced as titles to inform and create narratives for visual elements.

A pair of large plastic breasts labeled “Super Droopers.”
A two feet long rubber chew toy with orange bulbs on both ends.
A red SOLO cup full of half-thawed chicken feet.
A bag full of Joshua Nelson’s beard.
A petri dish with mice fetuses.
A burnt-out glue gun with strands of blonde hair around it.
Aqua beads soaked in black vinegar.
A picture of my five-year-old-self crying with chewing gum glued over my boobs. A plastic bag of flesh toned cosmetic sponges.

A bag of make-up sponges sold for $1.29. I opened it and took a sniff. It smelled like my mother’s pillow. My mother spent every Sunday night with me. She would leave my grandparents’ house the next morning for work. I always believed I could cling on to her. It never worked. My grandfather would wake me up instead in his bright blue sweatpants that smelled like his medicine cabinet. So I would bury my face in my mother’s pillowcase to smell her instead. My grandfather would then carry me to the living room and lay me down on a leather sofa. It felt cold even on summer days. That was my Monday morning until I grew tall enough to realize how childish it is to feel that empty.

I have been reliving my childhood since then. Hiding behind the weight of cultural and religious issues, I laughed at traditional values imposed on me and unresolved resentment the Korean War had left on my grandparents. When I moved to Singapore in sixth grade, I witnessed my mother’s loneliness as a woman away from her lover. When I came to America, I witnessed middle-aged adults, self-proclaimed children of God, be possessed with petty jealousy over the death of a family member. I now maliciously poke fun at the emotional conflicts and complex feelings adults engaged in, with different materials, from a glamorous piece of bronze to a cheap clump of fake hair.

So I started collecting. I collect cheap things that trigger feelings of shame; humiliation; regret; disgust; and sometimes humor. I frequent local dollar stores, beauty supplies, pet shops and sex shops to rummage through things. Some give me immediate answers and others have eldritch noise. I spend time with them. I wrestle with them. Most of them are willing to work with me at first. They would bend, squish, tear and bond themselves, as I demand. Soon they start to rebel. They straighten themselves up, separate from the others and refuse to be put back together. Like a frustrated, demented child, I angrily pierce, nail, shove and tighten them. Some give in, others refuse. They are awkwardly and precariously put together. I see myself in them, insignificant and small, yet screaming to validate my existence to someone.

During her stay in Rimbun Dahan, Lauren plans to create assemblages and drawings specific to this place, informed by the interactions with people, locals and expats that she’ll meet. Lauren will be with us throughout July 2018.

Carlos Carvalho

Carlos Carvalho

Originally from Brazil, in the last three years Carlos Carvalho has been living in Asia, first India, now in Indonesia. Using crafts techniques and everyday materials, like textiles (mostly felt), paper, cardboard and paint, he builds topographies. Those topographies are found through the combination and juxtaposition of shapes cast from his body. His process is time consuming and repetitive, almost meditative.

My body is the center of my work, my body is queer and I’m gay. Thinking queerness in places where it’s not welcome or allowed is what is going through my mind. Especially because Brazil is also facing a conservative wave right now that is pressing against women, LGBTIs and the African-Brazilian population.

At Rimbun Dahan, being in the middle of all this green I wonder about things that hide in the vegetation, in the bushes. Being mostly by myself, this also brings about the idea that things that we fear hide in the dark, among the plants. I decided to play with the idea of camouflage as a starting point, as we can think of animals that hide. I mock the hunter animal print over the casts taken from my own body – I fear they are part of each of us, that they are constituents of our minds. This is supposed to be a turning point of the dynamics of fear. The body parts originating from the queer-gay body to become the element that hides and hunts, I put the body in a position of power and control, which is what the queer body needs to have in today’s reality.

Find more of Carlos’s work at his website, and his instagram accounts: @carhencarvalho and @carloscarvalhoart

Morganne Mazeika and Zach Khoo

Morganne Mazeika and Zach Khoo

apparatus dance collective, consisting of dancer-choreographers Morganne Mazeika and Zach Khoo are currently at Rimbun Dahan developing a new work called “discussions with”. The intention with the residency is to explore human interaction through a physical means of communication. Their method of movement invention is extrapolated into a thematic focus of the work: how does one communicate.

As the founders of apparatus they attended The University of Texas at Austin. During their time there they danced in the projects and residencies of established international choreographers. Their research that led to the creation of the company began in the studio that gave way to their current process; incorporating multidisciplinary approaches into dance and the method of dialoguing movement.

At their recent open studio, they spoke about collaborating long distance by sending each other videos of themselves dancing, and how to now translate that exchange through verbal and nonverbal communication when in the same physical space.

 

Christopher Strong

Christopher Strong

During my residency I will continue my recent practice of finding small instances of beauty in every day life and magnifying it. By limiting my focus to a tiny space, I can find shapes, forms and colours that always around me but not often the focus of me attention. Usually my subject is nature thriving within an urban environment, but sometimes I focus on food or industry.

During my residency I want a new artistic experience by letting the environment change my work, both in the subject matters that will capture my attention as I live at Rimbun Dahan and travel in Kuala Lumpur, and how the physical environment that is very different to Melbourne.

I am a self-taught visual artist, painting with oils and watercolour. See more information about me and my work at my website.