Kelvin Atmadibrata

Kelvin Atmadibrata

Kelvin Atmadibrata (b.1988, Jakarta, Indonesia) recruits superpowers awakened by puberty and adolescent fantasy to assemble formidable armies of outlaws. Equipped by shōnen characters and macho ero-kawaii, his antiheroes contest the masculine and erotic in Southeast Asia. He works primarily through performances, often accompanied by and translated into drawings, mixed media collages and objects compiled as installations.

During his residency in Rimbun Dahan, he plans to expand a narrative that is triggered by a Malayan historical figure, Laksamana Cheng Ho. He seeks to learn the Admiral’s influence in today’s society, in particular in regards to his masculine identity and how it has potentially structured the perception of power, race and religion in modern politics. This will also be motivated by cultural findings during his stay in Malaysia, discussions and exchanges with locals as well as his constant interest in virtual RPG elements.

He will be updating his progress in weekly blog-like entries on his website.

Sarah Jane Parton

Sarah Jane Parton

Sarah Jane Parton (Omoka, Tongareva, Avaiki-raro) is an artist, writer, filmmaker, and curator who works across performance art, installation, moving image, drawing, photography, creative writing, and ephemera. She creates work that operates as social commentary, and consistently engages with the politics of being, often through collaboration.  She is based in Wellington, New Zealand and is a lecturer in the School of Art at Massey University’s College of Creative Arts.

She studied Design and Fine Arts at Massey University’s College of Creative Arts, graduating with an honours degree in Time-based Art in 2003. In 2012 she completed a Master’s degree in Creative Writing at Victoria University’s International Institute of Modern Letters.

Sarah achieved success straight out of art school when her single channel video work, she’s so usual (2003), was included in Telecom Prospect 2004: New Art, New Zealand – an inaugural survey of contemporary art at Wellington’s City Gallery. Since then she has featured in multiple group shows and public screenings both nationally and internationally, and has held six solo exhibitions, including Guidance at The Physics Room, Christchurch, and The Way at The City Gallery Wellington, both in 2007. From 2010 to 2014 she curated the visual arts component of the boutique music and art festival Camp a Low Hum. She is a member of the feminist art-rock collective, Fantasing.

Sarah currently lives in Wellington with her partner, musician Luke Buda (The Phoenix Foundation), and their two sons, who will be joining her for her three month residency at Rimbun Dahan from March to June, via a grant from the Asia New Zealand Foundation.

(Text adapted from CIRCUIT and Massey University’s website)

Chan Aye & Phyu Mon

Chan Aye & Phyu Mon

Chan Aye (b. 1954) is a sculptor, installation artist, painter, and writer from Myanmar. He was self taught before going on to study traditional Myanmar painting between 1986 and 1989. He has developed a unique pictorial language that is inventive and at the same time inherits the iconography of Myanmar cave painting and mural paintings, as found in the temples at Bagan, Sitkaing, and Po Win Taung in North Myanmar, as well as his studied interest in Western art, which the artist has studied in magazine and book reproductions through the years. His art is rooted in physicalizing the various states of life’s existence and spirituality, and engages with the dualities of material and immaterial forms: color, time, and the dimensions of human emotions, of anger, love, hate, and greed, with diverse materials such as paint, wood, marble, glass, sandstone, and paper from Myanmar Shan State, silk, motor equipment, lighting, bronze, and steel. Searching for new ways to merge traditions with the contemporary condition, he continues to create art through periods of political turmoil and change, and in the aftermath of the devastating Cyclone Nargis in 2008. Chan Aye has exhibited in Singapore, Germany, Finland, France, Hong Kong, India, Thailand, China, New York, and London.

Phyu Mon (b. 1960), writer, photographer, performance artist, and painter, grew up in an environment distinguished by strong tradition and rich culture. Since her teens she has written poetry, short stories and also painted. Now, her recent work is writing articles about art in Myanmar Magazine and Journal, as well as other international publications. Her work expanded beyond writing when she was introduced to video and film production through a program at the University of Finland, and also when she accepted a Diploma of Photography from Myanmar Photography Association. She is one of the very few women artists in Myanmar who currently works with digital photography and visual art. She is also the first female performance artist in Myanmar and has participated in several local and international exhibitions and festivals. She currently runs the Blue Wind Art project in Myanmar.

In her art, she presents the contentment and peace even of a hard life, the need for progress but at the same time the need to care for the environment. She is at present witnessing the cultural changes taking place in the urban areas through globalisation but she feels confident that the rural people, the true representatives of Myanmar, will not be overly swayed by western culture. Having struggled to break out of a restrictive and traditionalistic society, she knows how strong the culture’s values are. Her hope, presumed in her art, is that the best of these values will be kept intact for the sake of future generations. Phyu Mon has exhibited her works in Japan, Thailand, Hong Kong, Malaysia, Cambodia, Singapore, Korea, Denmark, Spain, UK, France and the US.

Chan Aye and Phyu Mon will be undergoing a two month residency at Rimbun Dahan. For more information on their work, visit Chan Aye’s website, and Blue Wind Art’s website.

 

 

 

Work It!

Work It!

Image: Doris Uhlich in 'Rising Swan', photo: Andrea Salzmann.

Work It! was a project bringing together female performing artists from Asia and Europe whose work revolves around the gendered depiction of the body on stage. For 10 days in November 2012, these artists met in Kuala Lumpur to share their artistic practice, create new networks and explore their diverse understandings of feminism.

Participating artists:

  • Cynthia Ling Lee (Taiwan/USA)
  • Rita Natalio (Portugal)
  • Donna Miranda (Philippines)
  • Joavien Ng (Singapore)
  • Cuqui Jerez (Spain)
  • Doris Uhlich (Austria)
  • Naomi Srikandi (Indonesia)
  • Mia Habib (Norway)
  • Geumhyung Jeong (Korea)
  • Un Yamada (Japan)
  • Margarita Tsomou (Greece/Germany)
  • Mislina Mustaffa (Malaysia)

Download: Work_It!_Press_Release
Download: Work_It!_Participant_Bios

Teater Garasi, in a play directed by Naomi Srikandi.Public Performances

2 nights of sharing their work and perspectives

Program A: 8.30pm, Friday 9 Nov
Program B: 8.30pm, Saturday 10 Nov

Venue: The Black Box, MAP @ Publika, Solaris Dutamas

How do you perform a woman onstage? How do you negotiate how a society regulates work, power, sex and truth? What is creativity’s reaction to convention? And how will women thrive in the performing arts in the current global climate?

The Work It! public showing tackled these questions with theatre, dance, music and good old fashioned women’s wit.

Entry by donation at the door
RM 20 regular, RM 15 for students, seniors & MyDance Alliance members.
Q&A session with the artists following the performance.

Cuqui Jerez, 'Croquis Reloaded'. Work It! Open Studio

The focus of the Work It! project is on the week of closed-door studio sessions for the participants at Rimbun Dahan, in which they will be sharing and developing their arts practice with each other. For one afternoon only, join the artists in an open studio session to get a taste of the Work It! project. All practicing artists, in visual or performing arts, and both male and female, are invited to attend.

2-5pm, Wednesday 14 November 2012
The Dance Studio at Rimbun Dahan

Free entry, but attendance is limited, so please register by emailing bhijjas@gmail.com with your name, phone number, and brief bio.

Donna Miranda. Photo: Brendan Goco.

Work It! Panel Discussion

At the conclusion of the 10-day project, the participants of Work It! will present a public panel discussion to discuss the process of the closed-door discussions at Rimbun Dahan and to share their findings.

2-5pm, Saturday 17 November 2012
Annexe Central Market
Free Entry

Work It! was co-produced by Bilqis Hijjas of Rimbun Dahan, Anna Wagner (Germany) and Fumi Yokobori (Japan).

Main Sponsors

tanzconnexionsGoethe_institutCreative-Encounters

Supported by

JFKL  wao

Public performance venue sponsor

map_publika

 

Moe Satt

Moe Satt

Moe Satt, a performance artist from Yangon trained in zoology and community development, was in residence at Rimbun Dahan for three months, from February to April 2008.

Bio

Moe Satt (b 1983) lives and works in Yangon, Myanmar (Burma). In 2005 he graduated from East Yangon University with a Bachelor of Sciences (Zoology). Since then, he has participated in over 25 performance events and four solo shows as well as digital art exhibitions.

In his art works, Moe Satt tries to reflect the order and disorder surrounding people and the neverending justification in terms of human internal validity. He started out as a performance artist showing his work in the galleries and on the pavements of Yangon. In April 2007 he attended a certificate program in Community Development and Civic Empowerment at Chiang Mai University, Thailand. He exhibited his first solo art work abroad at Chiang Mai University in June 2007. He has participated in international performance art festivals including Performance Site Myanmar 05, 8th Open International Performance Art Festival in Beijing, China and 9th Asiatopia International Performance Art Festival in Chiang Mai, Thailand.