Ross Liew

Ross Liew

Ross Liew (b. 1978) is the receiver of an Asia New Zealand Foundation grant and will be staying in Rimbun Dahan for three months from mid-April to mid-July.

I am a New zealander of Chinese and European ancestry. My grandfather’s story provides the entry point to this residency project which involves the exploration of Serdang/Seri Kambangan and Belakong and my family’s presence and activity there over the last 80 years. Serdang village and the site of the family orchid farm in Balakong have been substantially developed over the years and many relatives have now died or moved away. Within my family’s history there are themes of cultural and personal dislocation, forced resettlement and immigration. These themes presence and impact on my family history are key points of reference as I build a project specific to Kuala Lumpur and the Rimbun Dahan residency.

Learn more about Ross and his works at his instagram.

Sasi Victoire

Sasi Victoire

Sasi Victoire arrived in Australia in 1970, to further her education. Little did she know that this period of her life would develop her personal choices away from safe, familiar paths and direct her to an exciting path through visual art. She discovered a passion for writing and worked to combine visual images with text for human rights issues. She developed her public speaking techniques to skillfully target her interest in women’s empowerment, delivered at workshops, conferences and seminars. As a writer she has contributed to many international and national and local art journals.

She developed with the assistance of the Q150 and a RADF grant, her children’s books, Moving House and Crockee’s Country, which explores and celebrates Cairn’s sense of place. They emerge against the fascinating tropical backdrop of familiar, yet unique spaces she now calls her home. She continues to challenge herself to find new ways to work to seek new opportunities the arts in her community. Although a trained printmaker, she explores a variety of art processes as means to highlight, develop and uncover concepts that she is passionate about. Living in a very peripheral art landscape, her self-generated projects have highlighted Cairns as a vibrant and diverse artistic hub.

To devote more time on her own practice, she took up an artist in residence at Chiang Mai University in 2013 where she has created her exhibition Watermark. As a curator, she is increasingly aware of the value of the collaborative process as a means to strategically broaden and refresh her art practice. Her project Tropics to Tropics to Malaysia last year is to provide benefits to Cairns through soft diplomacy. She recently collaborated with Jute Theatre, Cairns and developed an inter-medial project Alice in the Antipathies that challenged her across disciplines to new areas working with music designer, Tristan Barton, videographer, Glenn Saggers and now is ready for an intercultural production with Masakini Theatre, Malaysia, in March 2019 and thereafter in April to Jute Theatre, Cairns, Queensland, Australia.

Sasi is our Resident Artist for three months supported by Asialink. She plans to connect and develop audiences for the coming performance in Malaysia during her residency. To find out more about her work, please visit her website.

Ruby Subramaniam

Ruby Subramaniam

Ruby Subramaniam (b. 1989) is a self-taught Malaysian visual artist.

In 2014, she quit her award-winning career in digital marketing to pursue her passion in arts.  Her experience in corporate communications now allows her to utilize digital marketing and social media as a tool to increase community engagement about art. She works actively with diverse communities to run art-related projects and events, including Art Battle Malaysia. This event gives the audience a chance to participate actively, allowing them to exercise their ability to discuss and appreciate art. With her own artworks, she draws inspiration from traditional Malaysian narratives and culture. She is fascinated by the romanticised idea of ephemeral art.

I believe art is a prayer and it has to dissolve. The sooner it decays, the faster it lifts your burden.”

Because of that, she is never loyal to any one medium, and instead, enjoys the creative process of experimenting with unusual and unexpected artistic formats.

For the past two years, Ruby has worked on huge contemporary kolams (traditional Indian coloured rice art on the floor) installation in public spaces for Publika and RapidKL. “As a traditional art form, how do we revive it using the same method that has been used for centuries? How do we bring it alive again?”

In 2017, using skin as her canvas, her project, This Body is Mine was inspired by the Hindu Goddesses to combat street-harassment and the general Malaysian society’s attempt stigmatise women and police their bodies. As a result of the work, the project was uploaded to social media platforms and consequently went viral and reached more than 2 million views across the world. This project was exhibited in several group shows locally, and internationally in “Be Bold for Change”, Adam&Eve DDB, London as well as a case study in ARTS and SOCIETY (IYGU) by Mémoire de l’Avenir, Paris. More recently, it was presented in UNESCO’s World Humanities Conference in Liege, Belgium in 2017.

During the month of March 2018, her new project, ANTIDOTE in Rimbun Dahan, she invited women to be active participants in her projects, by sharing their relationship with their bodies. Without imposing her ideas and concepts onto her “canvas”, for thirty days, Ruby listened to thirty intimate stories by thirty diverse women and interpreted them with body art.

Please check out her website, facebook and instagram to find out more about the artist.

 

 

Wong Xiang Yi

Wong Xiang Yi

Wong Xiang Yi (b. 1987, Kuala Lumpur) received her Bachelor of Fine Arts from Chinese University of Hong Kong in 2010 and her Master of Fine Arts from Taipei University of the Arts in 2016. Wong majored in ink painting and is trained in traditional Ling Nan Chinese Ink painting. She’s strongly affected by China’s new ink painting movement, Japanese style painting (Nihonga), and the impact of and trend of thought related to ink painting that she was exposed to while she was studying in Taiwan.

The medium of ink painting has always reminded Wong of the relationship between humans and the natural and how it contrasts with the rapid pace of life surrounding artificial objects. Wong can anticipate and work with fractional and overwhelming information through tedious preparations before painting. This process is like a ritual, a vacuum interval, where all the prattle of information is slowly processed, to intercept a process of thinking. She believes that a private natural space (Rimbun Dahan) will be a perfect place to calm down and experience ink painting media meeting the natural face to face.

Wong Xiang Yi is our Yearlong Resident Artist 2018 and will be exhibiting her works in our gallery in January 2019. To find out more about Wong, please check her website here.

Christopher Strong

Christopher Strong

During my residency I will continue my recent practice of finding small instances of beauty in every day life and magnifying it. By limiting my focus to a tiny space, I can find shapes, forms and colours that always around me but not often the focus of me attention. Usually my subject is nature thriving within an urban environment, but sometimes I focus on food or industry.

During my residency I want a new artistic experience by letting the environment change my work, both in the subject matters that will capture my attention as I live at Rimbun Dahan and travel in Kuala Lumpur, and how the physical environment that is very different to Melbourne.

I am a self-taught visual artist, painting with oils and watercolour. See more information about me and my work at my website.

Flor Alba

Flor Alba

Mirage catcher, graduate of Geneva School of Art and Design/Haute Ecole d’Art et de Design (HEAD) in 2012, Flor Alba draws and paints according to her aesthetic inclinations and contemplative imagination. Zig-zag wanderings. Surveying the contradictions of beauty, she feels the surface of humans, then dissects them. She works with oil paints, water colours, embroidery, pencil, and greasy chalk.

Neo-fauvistic chromatic surgery. Engulfed in pure and violent colors, forms sometimes blend into a cluster of graphic ornaments and unexpected scenography. Yet beings remain in the foreground, stripped of their earthly envelopes, letting go of the memories of past gestures: fragments of ancestral stories. The culture of ethnic rituals is the heart of her creative quest. She seeks to own pieces of life, objects and rites of no fixed origins, reinterpreting her own story in that mirror. She questions others, expanding civilizations, what is foreign to us and seems strange to us, as a way to question her own origins.

Flor’s artistic references are:

  • Matisse for his colours and repetitions
  • Gauguin for his freedom in colour
  • Lynette Yadom-Boakye for her portaits
  • Satsuki Shibuya for her abstract lightness
  • Marta Riniker-Radich for her acid colours in her original compositions
  • Karine Rougier for her stunning scenes

Flor will be in residency at Rimbun Dahan from mid-July to mid-September 2017. Check out more of her work on her website and Instagram.

Dhiyanah Hassan

Dhiyanah Hassan

Dhiyanah Hassan (b. 1989) is a full-time artist and writer whose works seek to map out the terrains between memory and healing. She explores how art, poetry, and storytelling are used to reclaim a sense of selfhood in the aftermath of trauma.

“Language forms our worlds. In the event of conflict or trauma, these worlds are held under siege by things beyond ordinary grammar. We kick so as not to sink. We build coping mechanisms to keep us afloat. We find other ways to speak, to scream, to not remain silent. We keep telling our stories.”

from 2016 Artist’s Statement

Dhiyanah spent a decade in between countries before returning to Malaysia with a Bachelor of Arts (Fine Art) from RMIT, Australia. While working on her studio project, she freelances as an illustrator and editor. Her writing has appeared in BACCARAT Malaysia, Star2, and Burning House Press. She performed at Georgetown Literary Festival 2016 and has created the cover art for two books so far – Wolf at the Door by J. Damask (Gerakbudaya, 2016) and All the Bodies We’ve Embraced by Sheena Baharudin (Perfect Binding, 2017).

For her stay at Rimbun Dahan, Dhiyanah will be extending on her investigation of the body’s relationship to water – how the sensation of swimming, floating, or moving underwater relates back to the act of remembering (or forgetting). Her project, ‘Swimming Pool,’ is a memoir-building process that combines visual art with writing, and will hopefully culminate into an art book in the future.

Find out more about Dhiyanah’s work on her website and Instagram.

Jeannette and Michel Lambert

Jeannette and Michel Lambert

Michel Lambert is an accomplished jazz drummer, composer and visual artist. He is currently working on a series of visual scores, collages and drawings combined with music that will eventually be performed by improvising musicians as well as classical trios. Jeannette Lambert is a jazz vocalist and multi-media artist who uses active dreamwork in her creative process (click here to see one of her works, Dream Haiku). She uses intuitive techniques to write poetry that is then performed by her trio which includes Michel Lambert and her brother, jazz guitarist Reg Schwager. Currently she is studying the idea that dreams, imagination and improvised music all inhabit the same space. They are both based in Montreal, Canada.

During their residency in July, Jeannette and Michel will gather ideas and inspiration from the surroundings and work on compositions and artwork for their upcoming performance later in the month in Toraja, Sulawesi. They are joined in their stay by their two sons who are also highly artistic, both in music and visual art, like their parents. As a family, they love to travel for inspiration and collaboration while dedicating their time to creating art. In previous summers they have attended artist residencies in Paris, Barcelona and Italy.

Jeannette, Michel and Reg have a musical collective called Jazz from Rant and have produced over 50 recordings of jazz and improvised music. Raised in Canada, Jeannette and Reg are from Dutch Indonesian parents and many of Jeannette’s songs reflect this cultural identity. Michel is from Quebec City, descended from a family of many classical musicians and composers and he draws on this background for many of his orchestral works.

For more information on their projects and creative ideas you can visit Jeannette’s website and Michel’s website. Jeannette, Michel and Reg gratefully acknowledge the support of the Canada Council for the Arts, which last year invested $153 million to bring the arts to Canadians throughout the country.

"Walter’s offerings” – Jeannette's photo of the fruit and nuts picked from Rimbun Dahan’s herb garden

“Walter’s offerings” – Jeannette’s photo of the fruit and nuts picked from Rimbun Dahan’s herb garden

Canada Council for the Arts logo

Jel Suarez

Jel Suarez

Jel Suarez (b. 1990) is a visual artist born and based in Manila, Philippines. Her craft is centered on the practice of collage, in which mostly old master works of art and past exhibitions – sourced from old books and catalogues – are intricately cut in an unconscious process. Her fascination with the body of draperies and structures, allows her to form, paint, and sculpt them in her attempt to produce ideas, narratives, dimensions, and landscapes.

The act of manipulating the archives is her way of understanding reproduced images – further distorting its original sense, and fragmenting them into multiple meanings.

Suarez has been exhibiting her works since 2014, with solo exhibitions at Vinyl On Vinyl Gallery, and several group shows under Artinformal Gallery, Underground Gallery, VOV Gallery, Blanc Gallery, etc. She has also participated in art fairs here in Manila, Hong Kong, Taiwan, and Singapore.

Her work can be found on her website.

During the first month of my artist residency, I plan to finish my pieces for an upcoming exhibition this June at Underground Gallery (Manila). The themes and focus of my work have shifted since last year’s proposal project – triggered by the current madness and repercussions of the Philippine government’s war on drugs, I seek to explore and intersect a narrative of its influence on our country’s social fabric. I want to develop new works which will look at how it has possibly structured the society’s landscape and perception of power, social class, and human life.

Rimbun Dahan’s living environment is ideal for cathartic work. I think that the cultural and creative dialogue between me and its resident artists will help strengthen my practice and extend the narrative for this project.

Sabine Reindel

Sabine Reindel

Sabine Reindel is a German-born fine art painter, whose work concentrates on cityscapes. During her six-weeks residency at Rimbun Dahan she will continue her series of cityscapes she has started to create while she was practicing law as an attorney in the United Arab Emirates. Thereafter she continued working on cityscapes in San Francisco where she earned her master of fine art at the Academy of Art University, in New York where she studied at the New York Academy and the Artist Students League of New York, and in artist residencies in Thailand, Singapore and France.

My art is about journeys, exploring new places and making them my own. My work concentrates on cityscapes of the United Arab Emirates, where I practiced law for the last eighteen years, San Francisco, where I received my education in art, New York, where I took classes at the New York Academy of Art and the Arts Students League of New York, Thailand, Singapore and France where I had artist residencies over the last two years.

My first calling has not been art. I went to law school in Germany and then worked as an attorney in the Emirates of Dubai and Abu Dhabi. Over the last two decades I moved a lot and I lived in thriving places that changed and still change a lot. With my paintings I try to explore the similarities of these places, but mostly concentrate on the differences. Each place has its unique architecture, which reflects its own unique location on the globe, its special light, its one of a kind flora and fauna. Seeing what make each place so unique makes painting for me so exciting.